Yorkshire Museum

History of the Yorkshire Museum

The Yorkshire Museum sits in the heart of the enchanting York Museum Gardens In the centre of York which is open to the general public with the river Ouse running along side it.

The museum houses five galleries showcasing some of Britain’s finest archaeological treasures from the city’s Roman, Viking and medieval past.

These include the Roman statue of Mars, the best example of 3D Roman sculpture ever found in Britain, the York Helmet and the stunning Middleham Jewel.

Since then, many famous and important figures has graced their presences right here. Stephen Hawkins and Sir David Frederick Attenborough, just to name a few.

Following a nine-month £2million refurbishment project the Museum houses five galleries showcasing some of Britain’s finest archaeological treasures such as the Roman Empire’s and many rare animals, birds and fossils from extraordinary creatures once swam in what we call Yorkshire today in exciting displays at our Jurassic World Exhibition.

Our York Observatory at the Museum Gardens is the major part of our Astronomy Collection. The 4 inch refractor telescope was built by York man Thomas Cooke in 1850, who went on to make the then-largest telescope in the world.

It was installed in 1981 when the observatory was restored.

Our aim is to make the Yorkshire Museum a must-see destination in a tour around the beautiful and historic city of York.

The refurbishment work has also restored the museum’s Georgian building, letting in more natural light and opening up spaces that have been divided up over the years.